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Would you push the red button?
Yes
80%
 80%  [ 8 ]
No
20%
 20%  [ 2 ]
Total Votes : 10

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Zeny
Honorary Member


Joined: 09 Aug 2006
Posts: 23539
Location: Compassvale Dr

PostPosted: Sat Mar 21, 2009 5:36 pm    Post subject: Would you push the red button? Reply with quote

ASIAONE / MOTORING / NEWS / STORY


Sat, Mar 21, 2009
The New Paper


Would you push the red button?

A TEENAGE boy lay writhing in pain on the train floor as a man rained punches on him.

An alleged con man managed to board a train just in time to escape his pursuers, who work for a money changer.

In both cases, which took place within the last two weeks, the culprits got away. And both incidents occurred in full view of other commuters.



In the boy's case, no one came to his aid.

An SMRT spokesman said passengers who are harassed or assaulted should press the emergency communication button next to the train door

So why didn't anyone sound the alarm?

In a street poll of 100 commuters, The New Paper asked: Do you know where the emergency button is located?

An overwhelming 87 per cent said yes.

We then asked: Would you press the button if you see someone suffering a health emergency onboard the train? About the same number said they would. It was the 'obvious' thing to do, said the majority.

The reaction was markedly different when we asked: Would you hit the button if the emergency involved violence or some element of danger?

Fewer than half of those interviewed said they would activate the emergency button.

And only about half (51 per cent) said they would hit the button to report suspicious characters.

Why the reluctance to help?

The reason: Fear.

Fear of getting into trouble for hitting the button over what may later be judged to be a non-emergency, and fear for their own personal safety.

Is the first 'fear' justified?

An SMRT spokesman said most of the incidents reported by commuters were mainly medical emergencies (fainting, seizures, falls, passengers or items trapped between doors) and incidents that involved suspicious objects being left unattended in trains.

Student Samantha Lim, 18, said: 'I wouldn't press the button because it's like I'm intervening and I might get into trouble myself.'

Polytechnic student Lim Xin Hua, 18, agreed.

'What if someone or myself ends up in danger?' she said. 'I don't want to take such risks.'

Most of the respondents pointed out that it would be hard to say who is a suspicious character.

Ms Regina Pak, 35, a property agent, said: 'He might look suspicious but not actually leave anything behind.'

She was referring to the videos that SMRT plays at stations to educate commuters on how to look out for potential terrorists.

Housewife Goh Lee Khim, 48, said: 'I wouldn't be able to tell if someone is a suspicious character.

'So, I probably wouldn't press the button as I don't want to be fined for misusing it.'

Under the Rapid Transit System regulations, passengers who misuse either the communication button or the emergency stop plunger can be fined up to $5,000.

The spokesman said: 'Both... should be activated only in emergency or life-threatening circumstances.

'Improper use of such emergency equipment will cause unnecessary delays to train service and inconvenience fellow passengers.'

By Joanna Hor Peixin, newsroom intern. Additional reporting by Audrey Tan, Bernice Huang, Darren Foong, Geraldine Yeo, Han Su-Ying, Michelle Tay and Pearly Tan



http://www.asiaone.com/Motoring/News/...90320-129984.html
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Daknioelh
Gold Member


Joined: 18 Oct 2006
Posts: 2059

PostPosted: Sun Mar 22, 2009 8:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

should be using SMS instead with particular about the person who send the SMS and also to describe the situation and the station currently on.
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Claire lee
Ordinary Member


Joined: 05 May 2008
Posts: 165

PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2009 2:07 pm    Post subject: Red button Reply with quote

Once I was on NEL in the morning and an old woman fainted in the next carriage, just so happen we had just pulled into Serangoon, the train was packed, there she was lying on the floor of the carriage, some people were trying to revive her and yet, passengers were trying to squeeze into the same carriage oblivious that there was a woman lying on the floor!

This only goes to show that S'poreans may not only know where the RED button is but are just ungracious and oblivious to things happening around them.
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New_in_sk
Senior Member


Joined: 22 Sep 2008
Posts: 293

PostPosted: Thu Apr 02, 2009 11:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This morning, i was on the train towards Harbourfront direction and the air-con vent above the passenger sitting area starts to leak and everyone just walked away. The water was all over the place and yet nobody press the red button to inform the control station. I was right in the middle of the next stretch of seats and can't reach the panel. And during peak hours, people just boarded the train without looking at the floor, i was really worried what if someone slips and fell. In the end, i alighted at my station and go to the control station to inform them.

Are singaporean really so self-centred that they think; oh someone will inform them? Or it's okay, i will be getting off soon.
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Pink_dolphin
Ordinary Member


Joined: 24 Feb 2009
Posts: 235

PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2009 12:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just forget RED button in NEL line is for what ? Talking to control centre or what ... Very Sad
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Chicsavvy
Senior Member


Joined: 12 Feb 2009
Posts: 289

PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2009 5:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Perhaps they should have a colour code of urgency.

Green - Minor matters such as verbal arguments, train maintenance, public annoyance etc.

Yellow - Physical violence, suspicious characters or subjects lurking around etc

Red - Confirmed death threats or matters that deemed to have an effect on a mass of people in the train.

And it's true, most Singaporeans don't help. They just mind their own a**es. The only certain thing these people help is to anything that's FREE.

Btw, pls stop those train staffs from sashaying up and down the cabins with their Autumn/Winter collection black backpacks.
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Bumblebee
Silver Member


Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Posts: 1215
Location: Singapore North

PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2009 11:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Monkey Face Thumbs Down
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YourWordIsYourBond!
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Chicsavvy
Senior Member


Joined: 12 Feb 2009
Posts: 289

PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2009 1:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Whip KNS
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Hajime
Senior Member


Joined: 25 Oct 2004
Posts: 437
Location: Compassvale

PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2009 10:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The problem is, how does one define emergency? What we construe as one may not be perceived the same by SMRT/SBST.

After all, as we are all very familiar by now, many things are viewed differently when people of different statures are involved, like mentioned here: http://blog.dk.sg/2009/03/19/phone-th...seizable-offence/ .

-> Phone threats are not seizable offences
"Under the law, verbal threat is a non-seizable offence where the police have limited powers of investigation and arrests. Nonetheless, when a report is made, the police will look into the facts and if no aggravating factor is found, the police will advise the complainant to lodge a complaint before a magistrate, who has the power to direct further action as provided under the law. The magistrate can direct the police to lawfully investigate the case and take further action where appropriate."

-> Assault is not a seizable offence
"...A 17 year old boy was beaten up on the MRT recently and the police also advice him to make a magistrate report..."

HOWEVER, when any politician is involved, whether the threat is verbal or not, or whether it is made directly , seem to be all seizable offences:
- "...Rag-and-Bone man being charge for threatening to cause hurt to Jalan Besar GRC Member of Parliament Denise Phua. The Rag-and-bone man called a hotline (Which MP Denise Phua wasn’t manning) and say he wanted to hit her." - he was recently sentenced to a 6-month jail. Sly
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